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9. The Bergford Home

This 1925 Craftsman has been home to Scott Bergford and family for 35 years. While full of charm, it was drafty, poorly insulated and seeping water. So Scott installed ductless heat pumps, insulated the attic, and weatherized. Simple energy improvements make life better!
9. The Bergford Home

Historic Home Remodel by Scott Homes and the Northwest Energy Team

This 1925 Craftsman has been home to Scott Bergford and family for 35 years. While full of charm, it was drafty, poorly insulated and seeping water. So Scott installed ductless heat pumps, insulated the attic, and weatherized. Simple energy improvements make life better!

The Bergford house is one of those cool Craftsman homes that came as a kit. All the pieces, right down to the kitchen sink, were delivered to the site. In 1925 the original owner did a good job assembling this home; it is charming and full of history.

Bergford Plaque

… Unfortunately charm and history don’t include much insulation. Or decent ventilation in the humid basement and bathrooms. Or air-sealing for drafts. And let’s not leave out the original heat source: the wood-burning furnace crouching in the basement. It was a never-ending cycle of sweater layers, socks, slippers and 3 a.m. trips to the basement to stoke the fire.

At last, Scott Bergford, award winning builder of award winning energy efficient homes and owner of a home energy retrofitting company, decided to practice what he preached: He did some basic energy upgrades on his own home.

“I do this for a living, you know,” says Scott with a grin. “It is amazing what you get used to and think of as normal. After we did [the upgrades], we wondered why we waited so long”

One of two new Ductless Heat Pumps

“I can’t tell you which part [of the energy retrofit] I like best,” says Patricia Bergford. “Sealing up the drafts and insulating made a huge difference but I think the ductless heat pumps are the most impressive. We came home from a weekend away and the house was warm; I didn’t have to run downstairs first thing to make a fire.”

Below is a list of what the Bergford’s have done so far to improve the energy performance and health of their home. Both Scott and Pat will be on-site during the Green Tour and will be more than happy to answer your questions about what worked, what didn’t and what they intend to tackle next.

 

Ventilation

● Installed a humidistat with a motion sensor in the basement. The fan runs continuously and kicks up when it senses extra humidity.

● Main floor bathroom has motion sensor and humidistat. It also has a fan that runs continuously. It clicks into a higher CFM when it senses movement. This is a good, cheap alternative to a heat recovery ventilator as it keeps healthy air moving throughout the main floor.

Heat

● Installed two ductless heat pumps (DHPs) on the main floor. They run quietly and take very little energy (comparatively) to operate.

Sealing

● Applied spray foam (closed cell foam) in the home’s lower storage areas to improve insulation and to seal air leaks. This foam is also covered with a special fire retardant barrier.

Insulation

● Blow-in cellulose in upper attic bringing the insulation rating to R-49. Cellulose insulation is dense enough to insulate and provide some resistance to air leakage.

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