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You are here: Home Summit EcoBuilding 2015 Archive 2015 Speakers

Speakers

Aaron Clark PhD, Stewardship Partners

Aaron Clark PhD, Stewardship Partners

Residential Rain Gardens: Site and Landscape Context, Costs, Benefits, and the Value Proposition

Every year, heavy rains lead to massive flooding across Seattle and Puget Sound, wiping out roads, flooding homes and flooding waterways with pollution from roads and sewage. We know that rain gardens are an effective, affordable and beautiful way to collectively address this huge problem. They are a way for homeowners to take ownership of their rainwater and put it to use creating a lush and verdant landscape, cleaning the runoff that otherwise becomes Puget Sound’s single greatest source of pollution. They create habitat for birds and butterflies, prevent flooding, recharge groundwater supplies, and prevent erosion in creeks and streams. But our success depends on creating the numbers of rain gardens needed to handle the volume of water.

Brad Liljequiest, Living Building Challenge Net Zero Energy Program

Brad Liljequiest, Living Building Challenge Net Zero Energy Program

Net Zero Energy Building Certification

Net Zero Energy is a sought-after goal for many buildings around the world and is becoming a more and more common claim. Yet, many buildings that claim to be Net Zero in fact are not; actual Net Zero Energy buildings are still rare. All such buildings rely on exceptional energy conservation and on-site renewable generation to meet all of their heating, cooling and electricity needs. The International Living Future Institute's Net Zero Energy Building Certification™ is the only program in the world that verifies net zero energy building performance.

Dan Ventura, Hawk Environmental Services Inc.

Dan Ventura, Hawk Environmental Services Inc.

The Front Lines of Indoor Air Quality

How we design, build and occupy buildings determines the quality of air that we breathe indoors. Air quality is invisible and easy to overlook, but nothing is more important for the health and safety of the occupants. Dan Ventura of Hawk Environmental Services is well-known in the industry for his expertise and practical experience on “the front lines” of indoor environmental safety. He will bring us his extensive experience of detecting, fixing and preventing unhealthy indoor air quality, backed up with case studies. Learn from his expertise as one of the leaders in this field: find out why we all need to know more about this important topic and how we can create buildings with healthy indoor air quality. We spend a significant amount of time indoors and our goal should be to create buildings with breathing environments that promote occupant health.

Dan Whitmore, Hammer & Hand

Dan Whitmore, Hammer & Hand

Mineral Wool Outsulation: Getting Cozy at Home in a Nice Wool Sweater

In the effort to reduce energy consumption by constructing excellent thermal envelopes for our buildings, Continuous Exterior Insulation (CI) has come to the fore as good practice.

Duncan Clauson and Kyle Murphy, Carbon Washington

Duncan Clauson and Kyle Murphy, Carbon Washington

Climate Change, Carbon Emissions, and Initiative 732

Initiative 732 is designed to move the state toward two important goals – fairer taxes and cleaner energy. Right now, Washington has the most regressive tax code in the nation. People with the lowest incomes pay the greatest percentage of their income in taxes. Cutting the sales tax for everyone and reducing the business and occupation tax on manufacturers would preserve living wage manufacturing jobs. Balancing these cuts by taxing fossil fuels encourages greater use of clean and renewable energy which will also give a boost to the state’s economy.

Gisela Stehr, Emerald Feng Shui Institute

Gisela Stehr, Emerald Feng Shui Institute

Building Green With Heart: Adding the Soul Back Into Green Building Technology

During the past decades computer technology has largely driven the greatest boom of the green building movement since its inception, unfortunately often at the expense of the delight aspect of building design, which is essential to creating healthy balanced homes, places that connect to our soul, and nurture us as human beings.

Ken Eklund, Washington State University Energy Program

Ken Eklund, Washington State University Energy Program

CO2 Heat Pumps

Refrigerants have come under fire over the past 35 years, for their impact on the ozone layer and for their global warming potential. These concerns have led to testing other chemicals for use as refrigerants, such as carbon dioxide (CO2). The big advantage with CO2-based heat pumps is that they can produce the much higher-temperature outputs needed to integrate with solar power, providing an important alternative to burning fossil fuels. This could help us transition to a solar future. This technology is already being used for commercial applications, and now it is on the verge of becoming available for residential applications. Ken Eklund of the Washington State University Energy Program is at the forefront of vetting CO2 refrigerant heat pumps and will present three diverse studies: one on water heating, a second on exploring demand response potential, and a third on the combined space and water heating in highly efficient homes. The current data shows CO2 heat pumps using half the electricity of a typical heat pump water heater for heat production — in the neighborhood of .5 kWh per gallon. By this fall, nearly a full year of data will be accumulated from the combined space/water heating research and will be available to share with you.

Leah Martin and Katie Cote, Allied8

Leah Martin and Katie Cote, Allied8

Waste Not: How to Be a Small-Scale Developer in the Big City

With a little creativity and elbow grease, beauty can rise from the rubble. At a construction site in India a pile of stone slabs is delivered. Each slab gets trimmed to be just right before installed as a floor. What’s left is a pile of rubble. Wait, it doesn’t have to be. The larger scrap pieces are laid down in a mosaic pattern on the exterior balconies. The spaces between stones are filled with smaller scrap pieces and the remaining gravel is pulverized into grout creating a rich finish that is maintenance free. All that remains is the dust carried away by the wind.

Michelle Jeresek, Ivon Street Studio

Michelle Jeresek, Ivon Street Studio

Case Study: Full Plane Passive House

The Full Plane Passive House (Portland, Oregon) was designed and built to both the Passive House and Living Building Challenge standards (all seven petals). The single-family residence gives form and presence to the owner’s ecological and social values, while providing a playful environment for her son to grow and be educated in sustainable living. To meet net-zero water goals, composting toilets, stormwater catchment, and greywater reuse are incorporated. The house sits atop a south-facing slope planted with native and edible perennials and a restoration seed mix, supports an apiary, and employs innovative grading techniques to slow the overland flow and promote infiltration. An Integrated Design Process brought the client, architect, general contractor, landscape designer, landscape contractor, and trades together to ensure project success.

Susan Jones (atelierjones llc) and Sloan Ritchie (Cascade Built)

Susan Jones (atelierjones llc) and Sloan Ritchie (Cascade Built)

Cross-Laminated-Timber Investigations

Emergence of building technologies that shaped new experiences of space, light, and materiality was a hallmark of early modernism. With the appearance of Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in central Europe in the 1990’s, the opportunity arose again to reconceive spatial and tectonic experiences. Much like the kern-form and kunst-form dialectic that Botticher and Frampton conceptualized, the crude 8’x40’x4” pine panel can be transformed into highly evocative experiences of space and light. Additionally, CLT arose as an alternative to more carbon intensive materials of concrete and steel. Its use promotes timber as a building material that if harvested responsibly, can elevate the region of Cascadia as an innovative culture of highly sustainable strategies. Presented here is a CLT House, construction by Cascade Built and design by atelierjones.

Ted L. Clifton, Zero-Energy Home Plans

Ted L. Clifton, Zero-Energy Home Plans

Designing the Positive NRG Home

Most people will spend twice as much on energy for their house and car over the life of a thirty-year mortgage as they spend on the initial purchase of their house. The true zero-energy home is designed to put as much energy back into the environment as is used to construct, maintain, and live in the home.

Tim Corrigan and Scott Wooley, Umpqua Bank

Tim Corrigan and Scott Wooley, Umpqua Bank

Financing Green Building

Greener, more resource-efficient buildings provide environmental, health and cost-saving benefits to building owners and occupants. Encouraging green development and reducing carbon emissions recognizes that building owners and occupants must have access to self-sustaining, scalable financing solutions.

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